The REAL face of King Tut: Pharaoh had girlish hips, a club foot and buck teeth according to ‘virtual autopsy’ that also revealed his parents were brother and sister
click through to read more (DailyMail) 


7 Facts That’ll Make You Delete Your Facebook

(Source: youtube.com)



scientiflix:

Alex Makes SparkFun Firefly Jar!

Firefly Jar Kit

By: Bite Sci-zed.
Audible.com Trial: www.audibletrial.com/BiteScized



How curiosity changes the brain to enhance learning



Mindsuckers



neuromorphogenesis:

How Technology Affects Sleep

If you’re addicted to watching television before bed, or frequently get rudely awoken by your mobile in the middle of the night, read on to discover how these factors can influence your sleep, and what you can do to achieve a better night’s sleep.


To Save the Planet, Don’t Plant Trees

Deforestation accounts for about 20 percent of global emissions of carbon dioxide. The assumption is that planting trees and avoiding further deforestation provides a convenient carbon capture and storage facility on the land.

That is the conventional wisdom. But the conventional wisdom is wrong.

In reality, the cycling of carbon, energy and water between the land and the atmosphere is much more complex. Considering all the interactions, large-scale increases in forest cover can actually make global warming worse.

Of course, this is counterintuitive. We all learn in school how trees effortlessly perform the marvel of photosynthesis: They take up carbon dioxide from the air and make oxygen. This process provides us with life, food, water, shelter, fiber and soil. The earth’s forests generously mop up about a quarter of the world’s fossil-fuel carbon emissions every year.

So it’s understandable that we’d expect trees to save us from rising temperatures, but climate science tells a different story. Besides the amount of greenhouse gases in the air, another important switch on the planetary thermostat is how much of the sun’s energy is taken up by the earth’s surface, compared to how much is reflected back to space. The dark color of trees means that they absorb more of the sun’s energy and raise the planet’s surface temperature.

Climate scientists have calculated the effect of increasing forest cover on surface temperature. Their conclusion is that planting trees in the tropics would lead to cooling, but in colder regions, it would cause warming.



scientiflix:

Why Are We Morbidly Curious?

Why is it so hard to look away?

Uploaded by: Vsauce.



Scientists Have Created Crystals That Make Breathing Underwater a Reality



scientiflix:

A brief history of melancholy

If you are a living, breathing human being, chances are you have felt sad at least a few times in your life. But what exactly is melancholy, and what (if anything) should we do about it? Courtney Stephens details our still-evolving understanding of sadness — and even makes a case for its usefulness.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-brief-history-of-melancholy-courtney-stephens

Lesson by Courtney Stephens, animation by Sharon Colman Graham.

Uploaded by: TED-Ed.



sagansense:

jtotheizzoe:

Jane Goodall shares an important message on the need for empathy in science, and how viewing intelligent and social non-humans as “animal beings” can help us not only treat them with the respect they deserve, but also understand how their complex biology and behavior is intertwined with our own.  

(from NOVA’s Secret Life of Scientists)

Explore my Jane Goodall archive for more from this wonderful human being…



Researcher shows that black holes do not exist

Black holes have long captured the public imagination and been the subject of popular culture, from Star Trek to Hollywood. They are the ultimate unknown – the blackest and most dense objects in the universe that do not even let light escape. And as if they weren’t bizarre enough to begin with, now add this to the mix: they don’t exist…

Researcher shows that black holes do not exist

Black holes have long captured the public imagination and been the subject of popular culture, from Star Trek to Hollywood. They are the ultimate unknown – the blackest and most dense objects in the universe that do not even let light escape. And as if they weren’t bizarre enough to begin with, now add this to the mix: they don’t exist…



The Science Behind Baking the Most Delicious Cookie Ever


Scientists capture the sound of an atom

For the first time, scientists have used sound to ‘talk’ to an artificial atom, demonstrating a curious phenomenon in quantum physics that sees sound waves take on the role of light.
The interaction between atoms and light is well known and has been studied extensively in the field of quantum optics.
However, to achieve the same kind of interaction with sound waves has been a more challenging undertaking.
The researchers at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have now succeeded in making acoustic waves couple to an artificial atom.

"We have opened a new door into the quantum world by talking and listening to atoms," said Per Delsing, head of the experimental research group.

Scientists capture the sound of an atom

For the first time, scientists have used sound to ‘talk’ to an artificial atom, demonstrating a curious phenomenon in quantum physics that sees sound waves take on the role of light.

The interaction between atoms and light is well known and has been studied extensively in the field of quantum optics.

However, to achieve the same kind of interaction with sound waves has been a more challenging undertaking.

The researchers at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have now succeeded in making acoustic waves couple to an artificial atom.

"We have opened a new door into the quantum world by talking and listening to atoms," said Per Delsing, head of the experimental research group.



Limits to Growth was right. New research shows we're nearing collapse

Graham Turner and Cathy Alexander: Four decades after the book was published, Limit to Growth’s forecasts have been vindicated by new Australian research. Expect the early stages of global collapse to start appearing soon


[The book] tracked industrialisation, population, food, use of resources, and pollution. They modelled data up to 1970, then developed a range of scenarios out to 2100, depending on whether humanity took serious action on environmental and resource issues. If that didn’t happen, the model predicted “overshoot and collapse” – in the economy, environment and population – before 2070. This was called the “business-as-usual” scenario.

The book’s central point, much criticised since, is that “the earth is finite” and the quest for unlimited growth in population, material goods etc would eventually lead to a crash… 

Click link above to read on.