7 Facts That’ll Make You Delete Your Facebook

(Source: youtube.com)



scientiflix:

Alex Makes SparkFun Firefly Jar!

Firefly Jar Kit

By: Bite Sci-zed.
Audible.com Trial: www.audibletrial.com/BiteScized



How curiosity changes the brain to enhance learning



Mindsuckers



neuromorphogenesis:

How Technology Affects Sleep

If you’re addicted to watching television before bed, or frequently get rudely awoken by your mobile in the middle of the night, read on to discover how these factors can influence your sleep, and what you can do to achieve a better night’s sleep.


To Save the Planet, Don’t Plant Trees

Deforestation accounts for about 20 percent of global emissions of carbon dioxide. The assumption is that planting trees and avoiding further deforestation provides a convenient carbon capture and storage facility on the land.

That is the conventional wisdom. But the conventional wisdom is wrong.

In reality, the cycling of carbon, energy and water between the land and the atmosphere is much more complex. Considering all the interactions, large-scale increases in forest cover can actually make global warming worse.

Of course, this is counterintuitive. We all learn in school how trees effortlessly perform the marvel of photosynthesis: They take up carbon dioxide from the air and make oxygen. This process provides us with life, food, water, shelter, fiber and soil. The earth’s forests generously mop up about a quarter of the world’s fossil-fuel carbon emissions every year.

So it’s understandable that we’d expect trees to save us from rising temperatures, but climate science tells a different story. Besides the amount of greenhouse gases in the air, another important switch on the planetary thermostat is how much of the sun’s energy is taken up by the earth’s surface, compared to how much is reflected back to space. The dark color of trees means that they absorb more of the sun’s energy and raise the planet’s surface temperature.

Climate scientists have calculated the effect of increasing forest cover on surface temperature. Their conclusion is that planting trees in the tropics would lead to cooling, but in colder regions, it would cause warming.



anarcho-queer:

Wal-Mart Ends Heath Insurance For Thousands of Workers, But Begins To Sell It To Customers
Walmart, America’s largest employer, announced that it will stop providing health insurance for around 30,000 part time workers, in order to cut costs.
Soon after announcing the plans to cut their worker’s health insurance, Wal-Mart revealed their plans to work with DirectHealth.com to allow shoppers to compare coverage options and enroll in Medicare plans or the public exchange plans created under the Affordable Care Act.
In a corporate blog post with the Orwellian headline “Providing Quality Health Benefits for Our Associates,” a WM executive wrote, “We will continue to provide affordable health care to all eligible associates, including part-time, who work more than 30 hours. However, similar to other retailers like Target, Home Depot, Walgreens and Trader Joe’s, we will no longer be providing health benefits to part-time associates who work less than 30 hours. This will impact about 2% of our total U.S. workforce”
Imagine if you were a Walmart employee working 28 hours per week right now. Imagine what choices you face right now.
A couple of quick thoughts:
1. Employees tend to work fewer than 30 hours not because that is all they want to work, but because that is all the hours the company will give them, because companies do not want to allow workers to go full time.
2. Walmart has enough extra cash to raise employee salaries by 50% if it wanted to. Health insurance for 30,000 workers costs only a small percentage of this.
3. Four members of the Walton family, who inherited the Walmart fortune, are together worth more than $140 billion. If they were so inclined, these four people could pay the $500 million increase inWalmart’s employee health insurance costs (covering 100,000 new workers) for the next 280 years.

anarcho-queer:

Wal-Mart Ends Heath Insurance For Thousands of Workers, But Begins To Sell It To Customers

Walmart, America’s largest employer, announced that it will stop providing health insurance for around 30,000 part time workers, in order to cut costs.

Soon after announcing the plans to cut their worker’s health insurance, Wal-Mart revealed their plans to work with DirectHealth.com to allow shoppers to compare coverage options and enroll in Medicare plans or the public exchange plans created under the Affordable Care Act.

In a corporate blog post with the Orwellian headline “Providing Quality Health Benefits for Our Associates,” a WM executive wrote, “We will continue to provide affordable health care to all eligible associates, including part-time, who work more than 30 hours. However, similar to other retailers like Target, Home Depot, Walgreens and Trader Joe’s, we will no longer be providing health benefits to part-time associates who work less than 30 hours. This will impact about 2% of our total U.S. workforce

Imagine if you were a Walmart employee working 28 hours per week right now. Imagine what choices you face right now.

A couple of quick thoughts:

1. Employees tend to work fewer than 30 hours not because that is all they want to work, but because that is all the hours the company will give them, because companies do not want to allow workers to go full time.

2. Walmart has enough extra cash to raise employee salaries by 50% if it wanted to. Health insurance for 30,000 workers costs only a small percentage of this.

3. Four members of the Walton family, who inherited the Walmart fortune, are together worth more than $140 billion. If they were so inclined, these four people could pay the $500 million increase inWalmart’s employee health insurance costs (covering 100,000 new workers) for the next 280 years.



Apparently Sexting Is The New First Base And Childhoods Are Forever Ruined

Depressing.



Six members of the Walton family have as much wealth as the bottom 42% of American families combined.

Every time you make a purchase at a Wal-Mart, you are supporting this statistic. You are supporting this reality. FUCK this reality! 

from the Economic Policy Institute Blog, 2012 (cited here



scientiflix:

Why Are We Morbidly Curious?

Why is it so hard to look away?

Uploaded by: Vsauce.



Scientists Have Created Crystals That Make Breathing Underwater a Reality



scientiflix:

A brief history of melancholy

If you are a living, breathing human being, chances are you have felt sad at least a few times in your life. But what exactly is melancholy, and what (if anything) should we do about it? Courtney Stephens details our still-evolving understanding of sadness — and even makes a case for its usefulness.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-brief-history-of-melancholy-courtney-stephens

Lesson by Courtney Stephens, animation by Sharon Colman Graham.

Uploaded by: TED-Ed.



sagansense:

jtotheizzoe:

Jane Goodall shares an important message on the need for empathy in science, and how viewing intelligent and social non-humans as “animal beings” can help us not only treat them with the respect they deserve, but also understand how their complex biology and behavior is intertwined with our own.  

(from NOVA’s Secret Life of Scientists)

Explore my Jane Goodall archive for more from this wonderful human being…



The Myth of the “Maxxinista”

TJ Maxx, or the licensee, manages all of the nitty-gritty stuff, and makes the product in factories at prices that they control. Then, they put the reputable brand label on the clothing and write that company a check. These branded garments end up at discount retailers and consumers buy them thinking that they’ve just scored an awesome Calvin Klein blazer.



A lake that used to be the fourth-largest in the world is nearly completely dried up, according to recently released NASA images.
The side-by-side images of Central Asia’s Aral Sea in 2000 and 2014 are striking.

A lake that used to be the fourth-largest in the world is nearly completely dried up, according to recently released NASA images.

The side-by-side images of Central Asia’s Aral Sea in 2000 and 2014 are striking.